Eight Awfully Good Roku Channels for the Cable Cord-Cutting Horror Connoisseur

by

So, you’ve devoured what meager horror content there is to be found on Netflix, Amazon, Hulu and the like, yet you still crave more? Well maybe it’s time to invest in that Roku player you’ve been eyeing. The device offers literally dozens of channels geared towards the ghostly and the gruesome, more than enough to keep the cable cord cutting horror connoisseur’s viewing platter full for the foreseeable future. They’re all worth sampling, but the following eight Roku channels represent our favorites for the moment.

shudder

1. SHUDDER

By now, Shudder is probably familiar to most horror fans, but this list would be entirely incomplete without it. Shudder’s library of horror films and TV series now number in the hundreds with a fair number of titles being exclusive to the service. What makes the channel special, however, isn’t simply its quantity, but its quality. As noted on their website, Shudder’s content is curated by a panel of “horror aficionados with a deep love and respect for the many peculiar varieties and genres of horror” and it shows. In short, your queue won’t be cluttered with the nearly unwatchable dreck that Netflix users have come to expect, but instead will be populated with classic Hammer horrors, offbeat 80s oddities, and new films fresh off the festival circuit such as We Are The Flesh and Sweet, Sweet Lonely Girl.

Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Horror in Small Doses: Another Séance Goes Wrong in the Short Film 3 Versos

by

It seems like people have always been trying to talk to the dead. The practice got to be so predominate in ancient times that the Torah felt it necessary to tell everyone to knock it off. If you have to ask why, then you obviously haven’t watched enough horror movies with a séance in it. Of course, not everyone followed that advice. Bad for them, I suppose, but good for horror fans.

In fact, thanks to the creep factor and the visuals involved, communicating with the dead has proven to be quite the popular subject in motion pictures. Since the very beginning, séances have taken center stage in such productions as The Mystic (1925), The Thirteenth Chair (1929), Night of Terror (1933), and House of Mystery (1934). And if the success of the recent Insidious franchise is any indication, séances have lost none of their cinematic luster even after all these years.

No surprise then to find fledgling filmmakers tackling the subject. Take, for instance, this freshman directorial effort from Antonio Yee, entitled 3 Versos.

Perhaps it’s due to his working in live productions since middle school, or maybe it’s because he spends his evenings moonlighting as drag queen super-monster Vander Van Odd.

Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

DTV’s The Void and Sweet, Sweet Lonely Girl Do Nostalgia Right

by

Nostalgia can be tricky. As a recent article at Scientific American notes, “negative mood was the most commonly reported cause of nostalgia and, within this general category, loneliness was the most frequently listed discrete negative emotion.” That certainly makes nostalgia sound like something to be avoided. However, the same article also suggests nostalgia can be “a psychological resource that people employ to counter negative emotions and feelings of vulnerability. Nostalgia allows people to use experiences from the past to help cope with challenges in the present.” So, nostalgia can be a positive experience as well. I suppose, like any other emotion, it depends on what you do with nostalgia that determines whether it’s good or bad.

Take the way makers of motion pictures handle nostalgia for example. As studies have shown, films based on existing properties and/or concepts that people have fond memories of tend to make more money than those based on new ideas. That’s why, as we’ve noted before, this year will see the release of the 8th Saw film, the 10th Hellraiser film, and the 19th (yes, the 19th) Amityville film. Sadly, most of these movies will probably be terrible, little more than stale, unimaginative cash-ins on people’s fond remembrances of movies past.

Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Lethal Weapons and the Lunatics Who Love Them

by

A glove with razor claws, a bloody chainsaw, a baseball bat wrapped in barbwire. Even if you’re not a horror fanatic, that insidious inventory likely brought to mind some of the genre’s most notorious killers. It would seem after all these years, each of these lunatics’ weapon of choice has become almost as iconic as the villains themselves. At least that’s the idea behind a fun little online quiz called…

Can you guess the horror movie or TV show by the murder weapon?

Hmm, I only got 13 out of 16 before having to throw in the towel. I must be slipping.

You know, archetypal armaments aren’t just limited to horror. Can you imagine James Bond without his Walther PPK or Dirty Harry Callahan minus his .44 Magnum Smith & Wesson Model 29? No, they just wouldn’t be the same. That’s because, as a number of psychologists have noted, a person’s choice of weapon can often say something about their character.

For instance, Joni E Johnston Psy.D., writing in Psychology Today, claims that serial poisoners “tend to be cunning, sneaky, and creative (they can design the murder plan in as much detail as if they were writing the script for a play). 

Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

He Took His Skin Off For Me

Horror in Small Doses: He Took His Skin Off For Me

by

A short film about a guy who removes all of his skin just to make his girlfriend happy? Something like that probably just exists for nothing more than the gross-out factor, right? Well, don’t be too sure.

Okay, so it’s a little gross. Still, there’s more going on in director Ben Aston’s little horror-drama than just the icky stuff (which is done extremely well, by the way). Writing in her paper, The Psychological Significance of the Skin from Freud to Today, Harvard University’s Jennifer van der Grinten suggests the following…

“The skin, the human body’s largest organ, exists as a physical barrier between the milieu intérieur of an organism and everything in the outside world… From a psychological standpoint, the skin demarcates the outer surface of the self and is the part of a person most readily accessible to the observant eye; it therefore appears to be the most appropriate site for the somatic transformation of subjective  psychological contents.”

From there, van der Grinten moves into Freudian territory…

“As a semi-permeable membrane, the self exists as an ever-changing, quivering substance that exists only as a result of the physico-chemical reactions occurring between the biological substrate of the id and all of the events occurring in the outside world.

Continue ReadingPrevious Reading