Family Friendly
The Promise

The Promise spotlights ‘forgotten genocide’ of World War I

by

The persecution of religious and ethnic minorities has tragically become common in some parts of the world, and an upcoming movie serves to remind us that the battle against prejudice is far from new.

The Promise (PG-13) opens in theaters April 21, spotlighting a time during the 1910s when the Ottoman Empire turned against its own people and killed an estimated 1.5 million Armenian Christians in what became known as the Armenian Genocide.

Although it was one of the worst atrocities in human history, few people in America know about it. It is sometimes called the “forgotten genocide. It took place during World War I.

The Promise stars Golden Globe Award-winner Oscar Isaac as Michael Boghosian, a medical student who returns to his village in Turkey in 1914 with the goal of bringing modern medicine to the people. There he meets Chris Myers (played by Academy Award-winner Christian Bale) and Ana (Charlotte le Bon), an Armenian artist from Paris.

The two men love Ana, but those interests are put aside when the Ottoman Empire turns against some of its own people. Watch the trailer below.

The Promise is rated PG-13 for thematic material including war atrocities, violence and disturbing images, and for some sexuality.

Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

ClearPlay

ClearPlay CEO opens up about VidAngel & future of movie filtering (Interview)

by

More than a decade after helping spark the movie-filtering craze, ClearPlay appears to be the last company standing.

ClearPlay launched its first DVD player in 2004 and then added a streaming service in 2014 before an upstart company – VidAngel – took a chunk of its business by offering streaming movies for only $1. But when Hollywood studios successfully sued VidAngel last year in a copyright/license case and a judge forced VidAngel to stop streaming movies, ClearPlay was left as the only remaining company in the U.S. offering families a way to skip violence, nudity and coarse language in movies watched at home. (VidAngel is appealing.)

“VidAngel did eat into ClearPlay’s business,” ClearPlay CEO Matt Jarman told SCENES. “From the outset we knew that VidAngel had legal problems, though.”

ClearPlay offers two services: 1) DVD and Blu-ray players that allow families to watch clean versions of PG-, PG-13- and R-rated movies, and, 2) a streaming service that works on a laptop or desktop through Google Play.

Jarman would not provide additional details but did indicate that ClearPlay could be offering a new streaming service as soon as later this year.

Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Torchlighters

‘Torchlighters’ cartoons prove that 21st-century kids can enjoy church history

by

In the age of Disney, Pixar and $200 million animated blockbusters, a modest Pennsylvania-based ministry has — somehow — captured the hearts and minds of children with cartoons about church history.

The non-profit organization, the Christian History Institute, is set to release its 16th animated Torchlighters DVD later this year. Its first release, “The Jim Elliot Story,” released over a decade ago proved that children’s stories about Christian heroes can compete within homes against other animations such as Toy Story, Finding Nemo and Frozen.

Of course, the Torchlighters aren’t as popular in the broader market as well-known films, but with more than 700,000 DVDs sold, the series has found a niche market that anxiously awaits each new release. Each one lasts 30 minutes.

“One huge advantage we have is that these stories are true,” Dawn Moore, editorial director of the Christian History Institute, told SCENES. “We frequently hear that children are just amazed when they learn that these things actually happened, that they are not fictionalized as most stories now are.”

The series has spotlighted popular heroes of the faith such as Augustine, Martin Luther and John Wesley, but also less well-known ones including Richard Wurmbrand, Robert J.

Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Frankly Faraci Show

New Show ‘Frankly Faraci’ Spotlights Famous People of Faith

by

A veteran journalist with a wide-ranging background will host the Dove Channel’s first original series beginning March 21, and he hopes it changes how the world views people of faith.

Matthew Faraci’s new show, “Frankly Faraci,” will give a behind-the-scenes look at high-profile people within entertainment, music, sports, business and politics who say their faith makes them tick.

The Dove Channel is a Netflix-type streaming service that carries only family-friendly programming.

“I want kids to see real role models, people who they can honestly look up to,” Faraci told SCENES.

In Season 1, Faraci interviews The Piano Guys, the sketch comedy group Studio C, YouTube sensations Daniel and Lincoln Markham of What’s (In)side?, former NFL linebacker Bryan Schwartz and his wife Diane, and hip-hop artist Propaganda. Each episode is 22 minutes.

“We know that families all over America are going to enjoy Matthew’s heart-felt interviewing style and his uncanny ability to get people to talk about their true passions,” said Erick Opeka of Cinedigm, which owns the Dove Channel. Opeka is the executive producer.

Frankly FaraciFaraci is president of the marketing agency Inspire Buzz, and has had stints in journalism, politics and even comedy.

Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Facing Darkness

Facing Darkness Reveals Incredible Story Behind Rescue of Ebola Doctor, Nurse

by

When volunteers from around the world flew into West Africa in 2014 to help battle the Ebola epidemic, they knew there was a risk that they, too, could get sick and die. They went anyway.

The invisible killer was Ebola, which according to the World Health Organization had a death rate of up to 90 percent, was spreading rapidly and threatening to become a worldwide pandemic.

Medical missionaries Kent Brantly of Samaritan’s Purse and Nancy Writebol of Serving in Mission were among those volunteers who rushed into Liberia when others were fleeing the country, and – despite taking the necessary precautions, which included wearing a full-body protective suit – they caught Ebola.

It appeared as if they had received a likely death sentence. At the time there were more than 650 deaths out of 1,200 cases.

But through a partnership between Samaritan’s Purse and the U.S. government, Brantly and Writebol were flown to America for treatment – and survived. It was the first time an Ebola patient had been evacuated to the United States.

Their stories are now the subject of a documentary, Facing Darkness, which details the incredible rescue and explains – in their own words – why they chose to risk their lives to fight the epidemic. 

Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Continue ReadingPrevious Reading